Dr. Cindy Gellner tests your knowledge of what's true and not true about acne. From tanning to makeup to washing your face, Dr. Gellner debunks the many myths surrounding the dreaded acne problem many teenagers face.">

Feb 13, 2017 — On this episode of Debunking Old Wives’ Tales, pediatrician Dr. Cindy Gellner tests your knowledge of what's true and not true about acne. From tanning to makeup to washing your face, Dr. Gellner debunks the many myths surrounding the dreaded acne problem many teenagers face.

Interview

Dr. Gellner: Do you think you already know all there is to know about acne? You may be surprised that some of the things you've heard about acne aren't actually true. We'll talk old wives tales and acne on today's Scope. I'm Dr. Cindy Gellner.

Announcer: Remember that one thing that one person told you that one time about what you should or shouldn't do when raising your kids? Find out if it's true or not. This is "Debunking Old Wives' Tales" with Dr. Cindy Gellner on The Scope.

Dr. Gellner: Myth number one, "Tanning clears up the skin." Fact: tanning may mask the appearance of acne, but the sun can actually make the skin more dry and irritated, which triggers breakouts. The sun can cause premature signs of aging and skin cancer so be sure to always wear sunscreen with a high SPF and choose one that says noncomedogenic on the label. That means it won't cause pores.

Myth number two, "The more you wash your face, the fewer breakouts you'll have." Nope. Washing your face helps remove dirt and oil from your pores, but it can also cause dryness and irritation. Again, that means more breakouts. The best thing is to wash with a mild soap, don't scrub and gently pat your face dry when you're done.

Myth number three, "Popping pimples will make them go away faster." No. We all know sometimes it's really hard to resist popping a pimple. But it can push bacteria, dead skin cells and oil further into the skin, causing more swelling and redness. And it can also lead to scarring. Applying gentle pressure with a clean, warm, wet washcloth can sometimes help. But if there are a lot of pimples that need popping, best to head to the dermatologist for help.

Myth number four, "Don't wear makeup if you want clear skin." Fact, is long as you choose cosmetics that are noncomedogenic, again, meaning they won't cause breakouts, they shouldn't cause the breakouts. In fact, some makeup now contains benzoyl peroxide or salicylic acid, both of which help to fight acne. If you're still having breakouts or irritation, talk to a dermatologist about what makeup might be right for you.

Myth number five, "If you keep getting breakouts, it helps to use more acne medication until the breakouts stop." False. Acne medication contains drying agents like benzoyl peroxide and salicylic acid. Using too much may cause over-drying, again, leading to irritation. Notice a pattern here, over-drying leads to irritation, leads to pimples. If over-the-counter medication doesn't seem to work on your acne, it's a good idea to talk to your doctor or dermatologist. There are medications we can prescribe that can help with those pesky pimples.

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