Aug 04, 2020

Scientists Develop New Models to Accelerate Progress in Preventing Drug Resistance in Lung and Pancreas Cancers

Scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah report today the development of new models to study molecular characteristics of tumors of the lung and pancreas that are driven by mutations in a gene named NTRK1. The findings were published today in the journal Cell Reports.

Jun 02, 2020

Researchers Identify a Moving Target in Small Cell Lung Tumors

About 15 percent of lung cancers are classified as small cell lung cancer. Recent studies have indicated that four major subtypes of small cell lung cancer exist, yet approaches to tailor treatment of these subtypes have not yet become standard of care. Today in the journal Cancer Cell, scientists outline new findings about the origins of these lung cancer subtypes, paving the way for a new foundation to study this disease.

Mar 09, 2020

HCI Post-Doctoral Fellow Receives Award from the National Cancer Institute

Aria Vaishnavi, PhD, a post-doctoral fellow at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah has received the first annual National Cancer Institute Pathway to Independence Award for Outstanding Early Stage Postdoctoral Researchers. The “Early K99” grant supports researchers who need only a short period of training and mentorship after their doctoral degrees and before they’re hired into a faculty position.

Mar 03, 2020

HCI Researcher Finds Possible Reason for Lung Cancer Driver

About one-third of lung cancer patients who have never smoked have a small portion of DNA missing in the gene called EGFR. This missing portion is a mutation that drives cancer and causes tumors. In a recent study, Lyska Emerson, MD, looked at the patterns of four non-mutated EGFR genes. She was in search of a “destabilizing DNA sequence.” This sequence could explain why that portion of the DNA—called the exon 19 deletion—goes missing in some people.

Mar 01, 2020

Entender el Cáncer desde sus Inicios

Mediante una mejor comprensión del cáncer en sus etapas más tempranas—y un conocimiento más profundo del comportamiento de las células saludables—esclarecemos los precursores del cáncer y lo que permite que un cáncer crezca. Lea algunos puntos destacados de estudios notables recientes en HCI que impulsan nuestro empeño por entender el cáncer desde sus inicios y usar dicha información en la creación y las mejoras de nuevos tratamientos contra el cáncer.

Mar 01, 2020

To Understand Cancer from Its Beginnings

By better understanding cancer in its earliest stages—and a deeper knowledge of healthy cell behavior—we shed light on the precursors of cancer and what allows a cancer to grow. Read just a few highlights of noteworthy recent studies at HCI that advance our quest to understand cancer from its beginnings and to use that information in the creation and improvement of new cancer treatments.

Nov 26, 2019

Even Non-Smokers Can Get Lung Cancer

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States for both men and women. It claims more lives every year than colon, prostate, ovarian, and breast cancers combined. People who smoke tobacco have the greatest risk, but people who have never smoked can also get lung cancer.

Nov 20, 2019

Letter of Hope from the Oliver Lab

We know how cancer impacts your lives. It has touched our lives too. We want you to know we are working hard every day to uncover clues and new strategies for treating lung cancer. Lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer-related death in the United States and in Utah. Unfortunately, because of the stigma associated with smoking and the relatively few survivors of lung cancer, funding for lung cancer research is relatively low. Yet we know that people of all ages can develop lung cancer, including non-smokers, and our discoveries in lung cancer can affect the treatment of many types of cancer.