Dr. Michael McIntosh, scientist at University of Utah Health, is working to isolate pain-killing compounds that could serve as a non-addictive Health Minute.

Learn more about this topic in the full-length interview.">

Apr 19, 2017 — Venom from a small-shell snail from the Caribbean Sea could hold the secret to a new type of pain killer. Dr. Michael McIntosh, scientist at University of Utah Health, is working to isolate pain-killing compounds that could serve as a non-addictive Health Minute.

Learn more about this topic in the full-length interview.

Interview

Announcer: "The Health Minute" produced by University of Utah Health.

Interviewer: Developing painkillers from snail venom. Dr. Michael McIntosh is a biologist and psychiatrist at University of Utah Health. Why snail venom as a potential painkiller?

Dr. McIntosh: Each species, and there are hundreds of them, has hundreds of unique components in their venom. There are literally tens of thousands of unique components, which are designed to capture prey and, therefore, designed to work on the nervous system.

Interviewer: And it turns out that a particular component of the venom not only treats short-term pain but it also repairs damaged nerves that are the root cause of many types of chronic pain. Dr. McIntosh is currently testing the compounds as a way to protect against nerve damage to reduce pain for certain chemotherapy treatments, but in time, this research might lead to a non-addictive replacement for opioids to treat many types of long-term pain.

Announcer: To find out more about this and other health and wellness topics visit TheScopeRadio.com.


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