Dr. Jennifer Plumb says most stereotypical thinking is wrong—children, middle-aged women and elders are actually more likely to experience an overdose. On today's Health Minute, find out why and what you can do to prevent an overdose death.">

Nov 10, 2017 — You may have a mental image of the type of people who are at risk of an opioid overdose, but it may not reflect reality. Dr. Jennifer Plumb says most stereotypical thinking is wrong—children, middle-aged women and elders are actually more likely to experience an overdose. On today's Health Minute, find out why and what you can do to prevent an overdose death.

Interview

Announcer: The Health Minute, produced by University of Utah Health.

Interviewer: Who is at risk of an opioid overdose death? Dr. Jennifer Plumb says the answer might surprise you.

Dr. Plumb: Most of the stereotypical thinking about who is at risk of opioid overdose death does not really reflect who we're losing. We have children who are at risk, 45 to 54-year-old women who are at risk. We have elders within our communities, veterans, and people who have been with a period of abstinence. All of these populations are those we're losing to opiate overdose death.

Interviewer: And if you or somebody you care about is in one of these groups, you say they should have a naloxone kit?

Dr. Plumb: Absolutely, they should. Naxolone is a pure antidote to an opiate overdose. There are multiple ways that you can acquire a kit, and you are legally empowered and encouraged to have these kits to save the life of someone around you.

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