Dr. Troy Madsen says usually everything will be fine for young people, but older people may need additional attention. Learn what you can do to help someone recorder if they faint.">

Sep 20, 2017 — When somebody faints, it can be brief but pretty dramatic. Is there a need for alarm? Causes of fainting can vary from anxiety, hunger, to low blood sugar. On today's Health Minute, emergency room physician Dr. Troy Madsen says usually everything will be fine for young people, but older people may need additional attention. Learn what you can do to help someone recorder if they faint.

Interview

Announcer: The Health Minute, produced by University of Utah Health.

Interviewer: Somebody faints, it could appear really dramatic, but is it really all that dangerous? Dr. Troy Madsen's an emergency room physician. If somebody faints, what do you recommend that other people do?

Dr. Madsen: So when someone faints, it's usually a pretty dramatic thing. You know, you may see them fall down from standing. They come down pretty hard. If you're there at the scene, make sure they're breathing, make sure they have a pulse. If everything's in place there, they're probably going to be okay.

In my experience, when we see young, healthy people who come in after fainting, 99.9% of the time, everything's fine. In older people, that may be a little bit different. Older people may have other health problems and things that require additional testing.

But, if you're there, let the person lie down, give them some time to wake up. Usually, within about 30 seconds, they'll be awake. They can gradually stand up, start walking as they feel more comfortable. But again, young, healthy people, probably going to be okay.

Announcer: To find out more about this and other health and wellness topics, visit thescoperadio.com.


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